loose fill Tag

10 Mar 2011 How to Beat the New USPS Rate Increases

Rate increaseAs a substantial U.S. Postal Service rate increase goes into effect on April 17, many in the mailing and fulfillment industry are seeking ways to help minimize the increase, or better yet, reduce costs. Packaging can be an important component in that effort and will either help or hurt your bottom line. Here are a few guidelines to keep in mind. REVIEW Packaging Size does matter and so does shape. Is the item being mailed in the smallest possible container? It is not unusual for us to see items shipping in a container that is much larger than necessary because it was created by a design or marketing person with absolutely no regard for postage or shipping costs. The USPS rewards automation and penalizes packages that aren’t automatable. That cute, eye catching die cut your designer is so proud of might be costing you big money.
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25 Jan 2011 Globe Guard “Packaging 101” Lesson: Don’t Let Under Filled Boxes Create Overwhelming Problems (Part 2)

[caption id="attachment_2305" align="alignright" width="300" caption="A 3-POUND BRICK EASILY SEPARATES TAPE FROM A SEALED BOX."]3-lb. brick easily seperates tape from box[/caption] Now that we’ve covered what usually causes under filled boxes and what mistakes are made in an effort to solve the problem, let’s get into the solutions The #1 Most Common, Correct Solution Please note that the list of ineffective solutions for under filled boxes provided in part one of this post does not include the item that is most frequently the problem, which is the void fill product being used. Most packing operations have been using the same void fill and packing method for years, and in many cases it is the wrong material and/or it is incorrectly being used. New void fill products are constantly being created or improved, so what may have been the best and least expensive product just a few years ago is rarely still the best answer. Another common mistake people make in regard to void fill is focusing on the price rather than the cost. If the box is sized properly, the correct void fill is used and it is applied correctly, the void fill cost should decrease, not increase.
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20 Jan 2011 Globe Guard “Packaging 101” Lesson: Don’t Let Under Filled Boxes Create Overwhelming Problems (Part 1)

[caption id="attachment_2290" align="alignright" width="281" caption="LOOSE FILL SETTLES CREATING UNDER FILLED BOXES."]Loose fill settles creating underfilled boxes[/caption] This year our plan is to continue being one of the best sources for practical sustainable packaging information on the Internet. We have also decided to at least monthly provide basic solutions that can benefit packagers whether they are green minded or not. In other words, providing answers to the problems we most commonly encounter in the field. One of the most frequent problems I have seen over the course of a career measured in decades rather than years (boy do I suddenly feel old) is the classic problem of under filled boxes. What are the reasons boxes are under filled?
  • Using the wrong size (too big) box
  • Packers attempting to be economical with void fill or trying to avoid over stuffing
  • Packers rushing or simply not doing a good job (poorly trained)
  • Using the wrong void fill for the application
  • Product or void fill “settling” after the box is sealed. (This is a common problem with flowable loose fill products.)
  • Air escaping from the product after the box is filled. (Soft goods and paper products are great examples of this.)
  • Using the wrong box sealing tape
  • Applying the tape incorrectly
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02 Sep 2008 How to Select an Eco Friendly Void Fill, Part 2

"Bubble Wrap Packaging Material" In the first part of this series, I described five general types of void fill --
  1. Loose fill materials
  2. Industrial papers
  3. Flexible foams and bubble material
  4. Expandable foam
  5. Inflatable air pillows
Now let's look at the qualities you may need from your void fill material, and see how the various options stack up. Surface protection. For glass, metal, and scratch-sensitive plastics, polypropylene (PP) foams are the least abrasive option, followed by polyethylene (PE) foams and bubble. Industrial papers, depending on the grade, may also work. Dust free. Loose fill, whether polystyrene or one of the various biodegradable varieties, are prone to flaking. Industrial papers sometimes contain dust as a result of the trimming process. For shipping things such as pharmaceutical or personal health care products, look in other directions for void fill.
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28 Aug 2008 How to Select an Eco Friendly Void Fill, Part 1

"Inner packing void fill materials" The best thing about void fill is there are so many options. The worst thing about void fill is ... there are so many options. Selecting the right void fill material is difficult -- keeping a few things in mind will help you make the right decision. Void fill can be broken down into several categories. Loose fill materials, commonly called "packing peanuts", are made from a variety of eco friendly and not so eco friendly materials, including polystyrene, corn starch, and paper. The weight of loose fill varies depending on the material, but generally speaking, loose fill is inexpensive per application, but messy and not very effective for cushioning. Industrial papers include kraft paper, newsprint, and tissue paper. Most papers used for void fill have high PCW content, are fairly inexpensive per application, and are easier and cleaner to use than loose fill. Industrial papers are available in sheeted or roll form, making them easy to integrate into most packing operations. Multi-layered papers have become more popular in recent years, mainly due to shippers looking for alternatives to plastic-based packing materials. Multi-layer papers, which are typically made on-site, provide excellent cushioning, but are significantly heavier than plastic alternatives.
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07 Aug 2008 Ecoblivious Packaging – Polystyrene Loose Fill

"polystyrene peanuts" Some types of secondary packaging material are far worse for the environment than others. One of the worst, in our opinion, is the old standby for void fill, polystyrene loose fill. Folks who use this material because of its (perceived) low cost and (real) speed, are, well ... ecoblivious. Polystyrene is recyclable, but not easily so. The material is extremely lightweight and therefore expensive to ship to recycling centers, which are often a long distance away. While associated transportation costs have always been high, the economics are now even worse due to the rapid run up in fuel costs.
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