Carbon footprint Tag

27 Oct 2011 A Versatile Sustainable Packaging Solution – Inflatable “Bubble on Demand” Products

[caption id="attachment_2989" align="alignright" width="278"]Clear, recyclable Bubble on Demand in tube configuration CLEAR, RECYCLABLE BUBBLE ON DEMAND IN TUBE CONFIGURATION[/caption] As the name would imply, “bubble on demand” is essentially un-inflated bubble packaging you inflate on an as needed basis. The benefits of this type of packaging material are enormous when you consider the cost of transporting and storing “pre-inflated” or ready to use flowable materials such as foam peanuts, pre-formed paper products or even rolls of pre-inflated bubble packaging. All of those space consuming products also leave a substantial carbon footprint behind compared to bubble on demand type products.
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15 Mar 2011 Now Globe Guard® Eco Friendly Packaging Products Can Help in LEED Certification Effort!

Delta InstituteFrom the beginning, our Globe Guard green packaging products have been valued by people eager to reduce waste, as well as minimize their carbon and water footprint. Not surprisingly, many of those same customers have also achieved or are working toward their LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification for their buildings and facilities. Now, thanks to the Delta Institute, Globe Guard packaging products will count and help applicants earn points in the “Sustainable Purchasing-Ongoing Consumables” portion of their application.
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02 Dec 2008 High Mileage Peaches and Other Absurdities of our Sustainable Lives

dole peaches dole peaches labelIf you look at the label on the pictured Dole product, you see that it is “natural”. I doubt any of us really understand what natural means anymore, but at least in theory, it’s a good thing, right? Shoppers everywhere just like my wife seek and buy products that are organic, pure and natural, even if the cost is a bit higher than those less healthy product options. I used to think these Dole peaches were delicious but I forever unintentionally ruined the taste by taking a closer look at the package and label. Near the top of the container you see ink jet characters that read “peaches from USA”. (Click on the thumbnail at right for a look.) I can only assume that is imprinted that way to give Dole some seasonal flexibility on where their peaches are grown and harvested. OK, I can buy that but at the bottom of the plastic jar you see that the shrink band label is printed ”Packed in Thailand.”
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24 Jul 2008 Gasoline – Another Reason to Stop Using Polystyrene Loose Fill

Foam peanuts.

Image via Wikipedia

A big carbon footprint is an excellent reason to find a new inner packaging material, but not one that arouses passion in most of us. But $5 per gallon gasoline gets everyone's juices flowing (no pun intended), and that's another reason - perhaps the most compelling reason - why polystyrene packing peanuts are the wrong void fill material for 2008 and beyond. Polystyrene packing peanuts are expensive to ship -- in fact, considerably more expensive to ship than just about any alternative product on the market. Peanuts are extremely bulky and lightweight, so freight carriers charge a premium to tote them around. I checked freights cost to ship 5 - 20 cubic foot bags, and the quotes ranged from $110 to $175. Whew! Freight surcharges are a healthy portion of the total, but those aren't going away any time soon. Want to get a freight estimate for yourself? Use this Roadway freight calculator. Class is 250. Figure 4-5 lbs. per 20 cubic foot bag. You'll be astounded.
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